Pokey LaFarge, Ruthie Foster, Fred Eaglesmith and more.

Mountain Stage with Special Guest Host Todd Burge

Pokey LaFarge, Ruthie Foster, Fred Eaglesmith and more.

Sun · February 12, 2017

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:00 pm (event ends at 10:00 pm)

$20

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is all ages

Prefer to purchase tickets over the phone? Call 877-987-6487

Pokey LaFarge
Pokey LaFarge
Pokey LaFarge is a musician, songwriter, bandleader, entertainer, innovator and preservationist, whose arsenal of talents has placed him at the forefront of American music. Over the last decade, Pokey has won the hearts of music lovers across the globe with his creative mix of early jazz, string ragtime, country blues and western swing. After signing with Jack White's Third Man Records to release his fifth full-length album (Pokey LaFarge) in 2013, he performed as a musical guest on The Late Show with David Letterman and The Late Late Show on Ireland's RTÉ One network. Pokey's rendition of "Lovesick Blues" with Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks, featured on an episode of Boardwalk Empire, was selected for inclusion on the series' official soundtrack (Vol. 2). Additionally, Pokey appeared in Disney's The Lone Ranger (both on screen and on the original score), was featured on A Prairie Home Companion and NPR's World Cafe, and recorded a song for ATO Records' Divided & United: Songs of the Civil War, produced by Randall Poster.

2014 has been Pokey's most momentous year yet; by spring, he had brought his music to five continents, with international tours in India, Australia and New Zealand. In the past year, Pokey's tour trail (consisting of over 250 shows) included appearances at clubs and festivals across the USA and Canada as well as two extensive tours in Europe. Pokey has played with the likes of Jack White, The Raconteurs, Wanda Jackson, Old Crow Medicine Show, and most recently, Carolina Chocolate Drops. As an opening act on Jack White's Blunderbuss tour, he delighted sold out crowds at Red Rocks Amphitheater and Radio City Music Hall, among other notable venues in North America. Pokey is currently touring with a five-piece backing band, including his original bandmates (Ryan Koenig on harmonica, washboard and snare, Adam Hoskins on guitar and Joey Glynn on upright bass), in addition to Chloe Feoranzo on clarinet and TJ Muller on cornet.

At only 31 years old, Pokey's career has not slowed in momentum since it began with his first release Marmalade (2007). Shortly followed by Beat, Move and Shake (2008) and Riverboat Soul (2010), Pokey quickly graduated from breakthrough artist to leading musical figure, receiving two consecutive Independent Music Awards for Best Americana Album (Riverboat Soul and Middle of Everywhere).

Pokey's music transcends the confines of genre, continually challenging the notion that tradition-bearers fail to push musical boundaries. Rather than merely conjuring up half-forgotten imagery of days past, Pokey is a lyrical storyteller, the plot delivered smoothly through his dynamic vocals. Both on stage and off, his effortless wit never fails to charm audiences, giving way to a live music experience that manages to be grandiose and unassuming all at once. Born in the heartland of America and based in St. Louis, Missouri, Pokey's Midwestern charisma welcomes his audiences with open arms.

Pokey LaFarge is on a mission, encouraging fans worldwide to think differently about what it means to celebrate musical traditions. Simply put, Pokey explains, "It's not retro music. It's American music that never died."
Ruthie Foster
Ruthie Foster
Ruthie Foster was born in the small rural town of Gause, TX. Raised in a family of gospel singers, Ruthie first learned to sing during worship services at her community church. With a chapel-bred bravado trained on the works of powerful women such as Mavis Staples and Aretha Franklin, her sound grew into an inspired blend of blues, folk and gospel.

Seeking to define her own path, Ruthie left her hometown to serve in the Navy. She discovered her love for performing while singing pop and funk tunes as the frontwoman of Pride, a band that performed at Navy recruitment drives nationwide. Ruthie's time with Pride provided a window into varying American cultures coast to coast, and after her service she moved to New York City to pursue a career as a professional musician.

After diving into the city's vibrant music scene, she became a staple in the folk community and was soon picked offered a development deal by Atlantic Records. Atlantic envisioned Ruthie as a pop artist, but Ruthie was focused on taking a step back to further explore roots music. She turned her back on the major label record deal and returned to her home state to spend more time with family and the music that shaped her.

Ruthie moved back to Texas and settled in Austin. Her debut, Full Circle, was released in 1997 and was followed by Crossover in 1999. The two albums secured Ruthie as an up-and-coming singer/songwriter in the Austin scene and caught the attention of Texas independent label Blue Corn Music.

Since then, Ruthie has stuck with Blue Corn to release seven albums over the past twelve years. Ruthie's studio album releases on Blue Corn Music include Runaway Soul in 2002, The Phenomenal Ruthie Foster in 2007, The Truth According to Ruthie Foster in 2009, Let It Burn in 2012 and Promise of a Brand New Day in 2014. The latter three were all nominated for Grammy Awards in the category of Best Blues Album. She has also released two live albums, Stages in 2004 and Live At Antone's, a CD and DVD release, in 2011.

Ruthie's career also reaches beyond her own releases and performances. She has collaborated on stage with artists ranging from Bonnie Raitt to The Allman Brothers to Susan Tedeschi, and has recorded tracks with Warren Haynes, Big Head Todd, and The Blind Boys of Alabama, among others. Ruthie has also been featured both as an actress, with a guest appearance on NBC's television series Revolution, and as a classical vocalist, with Austin's prestigious vocal ensemble Conspirare.

To date, Ruthie's artistry and creative output have both been lauded with accolades on regional and national platforms. Outside of her 2010, 2012 and 2014 Grammy nominations, she earned six consecutive Blues Music Awards, plus an Austin Music Award for Best Female Vocalist and a Living Blues Critics' Award for Female Blues Artist of the Year. And those are just some highlights of her awards history.
Fred Eaglesmith
Fred Eaglesmith
The heart of rock and roll is alive and well with Fred Eaglesmith's 20th album, Tambourine. Fusing together all of Fred's past influences, the result is pure rock 'n 'roll reminiscent of 1966.

Eaglesmith is a veteran of the music industry and at the same time is about as far away from actually participating in today's music industry as one could be. Never operating within anyone's boundaries, he continues to set the standard for independent artists everywhere. While blazing his own often colourful path he has avoided most of the traps and pitfalls of his peers, his career reads like a manual on how to succeed in music today without trying to fit into the traditional business models.

Tambourine was recorded live off the floor using an eight-track analogue console capturing the entire band playing together in the same room. Created during a month long session in an old hall in the hamlet of Vittoria, Ontario, Fred consciously stayed far away from anything that is popular in the mainstream music right now. The result a combination of Eaglesmith's craftsmanship in songwriting and a fusion of rock 'n' roll circa 1966, Motown, and even Tejano influences. Never one to shy away from taking chances with his music and career direction, Tambourine is no exception.

"When I put the songs together for Tambourine, I was thinking about the days when there were five push buttons on an automobile radio," Eaglesmith explains. "Everyone was listening to AM stations and, at any given time, one of those five buttons was playing a song worth listening to. The album is a walk through the garden of rock 'n' roll. The music's roots are firmly dug in the mid-to-late 60s. The primary essence is 1966 – the year that gave us Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde and Question Mark & the Mysterians."

Unlike Eaglesmith's previous recordings the songs on Tambourine are more based on the music rather that the lyrics, often building upon a main guitar riff or bass line. The days spent recording in Eaglesmith's one room studio were long and arduous. Often arrangements would be worked out on the spot and with the band playing numerous live takes in the studio.

On the other hand, like a lot of Eaglesmith's albums, Tambourine mixes rock 'n' roll and R&B with richly drawn characters, meaty themes and stunning turns of phrase. The opening track, "What it Takes," is a song that touches upon a subject Eaglesmith is no stranger to: dedication and perseverance. The plaintive rock anthem with an irresistible beat "Can't Dance," lends his voice to young and old alike in an age of musical genre boundaries. Eaglesmith's vocals fit perfectly to the heartfelt lyrics of "Engineer," a broken hearted man's plea for peace, and in "That's What You Do," a narrative set to the band's spacious and soulful playing. The band shows their musicality and versatility on the Tejano influenced "Small Town." The driving, soul-infused "Nobody Gets Everything," is a splendid breakup tune with universal resonance. "Sally Green" gives a psychedelic, gospel-esque portrait of the girl you hate to love. Tambourine closes on the blue, brooding song, "Whip a Dog," with Eaglesmith and the band locked into a deep hypnotic groove.

Eaglesmith, a songwriter's songwriter, has a depth that is informed by miles of experience as a true road dog. Fred is not only the star of show but also the bus driver and chief mechanic while on tour, keeping him and his band on the road. Unlike many of today's artists, touring is not something he does some of the time or only in support of a new record. Touring is his life and The Fred Eaglesmith Travelling Steam Show is one of the last full time travelling shows today. Their busy itinerary added up to more than 270 days on the road last year and saw Fred only returning home long enough to play a handful of local shows and to go into the studio to record the new album.
Rose Cousins
The voice of Rose Cousins is unmistakable.

Originally from Prince Edward Island, she lives in Halifax. She has released three albums We Have Made A Spark (2012), The Send Off (2009) produced by Luke Doucet, and If You Were For Me (2006) produced by CBC in Halifax, as well as singles and recordings in collaboration with artists across Canada, the US, Ireland, Australia and beyond.

She has garnered awards including the JUNO for Roots & Traditional Album of the Year, 2 Canadian Folk Music Awards for Best Contemporary Singer, 6 East Coast Music Awards, 3 Nova Scotia Music Awards, 3 PEI Music Awards, and a Polaris Prize long list nomination. In America, We Have Made A Spark was named to NPR's Top 10 Americana & Folk Albums of 2012, and recognized by USA Today, Oprah Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Folk Alley, Sirius XM, WFUV, WXPN and other media outlets.

The spirit of collaboration is in everything Cousins does. Her firm roots in two vibrant music communities (Eastern Canada and Boston Massachusetts) fuel her music with an evolving cast of talented fellow artists. At any show, anywhere Cousins travels, recruits from the local music scene appear with her on stage, be they emerging or well known. CBC debuted her short film IF I SHOULD FALL BEHIND about the community in Boston where her album We Have Made A Spark was made ( rosecousins.com/film ).

Equally unmistakable is the devastating emotions her music evokes. Her songs have appeared in climatic scenes in television shows including Greys Anatomy, Rookie Blue, Heartland, Hope for Wildlife and Drop Dead Diva.
RJ Cowdery
RJ Cowdery
Venue Information:
Culture Center Theater
West Virginia State Capitol Grounds
Charleston, WV, 25305
http://www.wvculture.org/agency/cultcenter.html