The Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Mandolin Orange and more

Mountain Stage with Larry Groce

The Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Mandolin Orange and more

Sun · March 26, 2017

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:00 pm (event ends at 9:30 pm)

$30 - $35

Sold Out

This event is all ages

This show is sold out.  A limited number of tickets may become available at 5pm on 3/26.

The Chris Robinson Brotherhood
The Chris Robinson Brotherhood
Mandolin Orange
Mandolin Orange
Mandolin Orange makes music that WNYC describes as being "laced with bluegrass, country and folk…often wistful and contemplative without being somber, and always firmly grounded in the South." The duo, comprised of Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz, have just announced the May 5 release of Such Jubilee, their second studio album for Yep Roc Records.

The group's 2013 debut for Yep Roc, This Side of Jordan, was released to critical acclaim which included coverage from American Songwriter, Magnet and a coveted year-end spot on NPR's list of Top 10 Folk & Americana Releases. In 2014 the duo played sold-out shows across the country alongside many festivals, including Merlefest, Newport Folk Festival and Pickathon.
Aaron Lee Tasjan
Aaron Lee Tasjan
East Nashville-based musician Aaron Lee Tasjan has always considered himself a songwriter first and foremost, writing his own off-kilter folk-inflected songs since he picked up his first acoustic as a teen guitar prodigy. "A lot of the stuff I did previously was never the main focal point," Tasjan explains. "It's all just been pieces along the way." His soon to be released Silver Tears (New West Records – Oct. 2016) will offer a glimpse through the eyes of one gifted songwriter and versatile musician. Whether playing guitar in the late incarnation of riotous glam-rock innovators the New York Dolls, the gender-bending, envelope-pushing sleaze n' tease arena rock band Semi Precious Weapons, the Neil Young-signed alt-country act Everest, British roots rock band Alberta Cross, Southern rock stalwarts Drivin' N' Cryin' or even as frontman of the devilishly cleverly-named Heartbreakers meets Replacements rockers Madison Square Gardeners, offer a glimpse through the eyes of one gifted songwriter and versatile musician.

While those stints may have never been his main destination, each one has been a stepping stone that has uniquely informed his songwriting and made him a compelling, singular artist. Tasjan's songs, as first heard on his debut solo EP, 2014's Crooked River Burning, are indebted to great American storytellers like John Prine, Tom Petty, Guy Clark, Steve Goodman, Arlo Guthrie and Todd Snider. They are imbued with wry wit, a sharp tongue and a lot of heart.

Last year's self-released LP, In The Blazes, received accolades from American Songwriter, Rolling Stone, Nashville Scene and NPR and suggested Tasjan was an artist to keep an eye on. While that album hinted at Tasjan's enormous potential, it's his sophomore effort, his New West Records debut, Silver Tears, that best realizes his artistic ambitions and solidifies him as one of the most intriguing singer/songwriters to emerge in sometime. An inspired and confident set of songs, the 12-track album, which features a cover with Tasjan decked out in a reflective suit and Stetson, careens from woozy pot paeans to brooding, cinematic observations to laid back '70s country-rock and galloping anthems to introspective folk and rollicking honky-tonk. "I might have made something that will surprise people," Tasjan admits. "I didn't completely abandon the recipe, but I really stretched myself and pushed beyond what people might expect from me. Being true as a musician, I'm not just one thing – and a variety of styles is a way to accomplish that. "

As in the song "On Your Side," which sees Tasjan warble, "I sing jokes/And call 'em songs/Nobody knows where they belong/I've come up short/For far too long/And what felt right/Now feels so wrong," Tasjan often turns the mirror on himself, never afraid to cast himself in a negative light. "One of the reasons I've been able to connect with people is by being honest and saying this is a really realistic picture of who I am," he says. "It's not always the good but it's me."
Rorey Carroll
Rorey Carroll
As a writer, Carroll's strength is showing beauty in everything, from smoky bar rooms to the littered streets. She not only seeks those places out, but paints them in gorgeous Technicolor with the voice of one who has been there.

Her song writing delivers the honest subtlety of living the life of a gypsy, while still longing for the simplicity of small town happiness.

"She's a poet. the real thing, easily up there with the best of her generation she blew me away.. and all the crowds too."
-Todd Snider
Tim O'Brien
Tim O'Brien
In Tim O'Brien's music, things come together. The uncanny intersection of traditional and contemporary elements in his songwriting, his tireless dedication to a vast and still-expanding array of instruments, and his ongoing commitment to place himself in as many unique and challenging musical scenarios as possible has made him a key figure in today's thriving roots music scene – and well beyond it. O'Brien's presence – be it as a bandleader, songwriter, mentor, instrumentalist, or vocalist – has been strongly felt not only in his own rich music, but in the many recordings of his songs by such artists as the Dixie Chicks, Garth Brooks, Dierks Bentley, Nickel Creek, Kathy Mattea, the New Grass Revival, and the Seldom Scene, and in his recorded collaborations with Steve Martin, the Chieftains, and innumerable others. Most recently, O'Brien has been performing before capacity crowds in the band of Mark Knopfler, who described O'Brien as "a master of American folk music, Irish music, Scottish music – it doesn't matter; a fine songwriter and one of my favorite singers."


Among the nuggets found on Memories and Moments are Scott's lilting "It All Comes Down to Love," which seems ancient until he sings, "Trouble is a cat on the freeway/Where the rubber meets the road she'll find another way," his achingly poignant title song, O'Brien's raw-silk rhapsody "Brother Wind" and Darrell's closing hymn "On Life's Other Side." These and other newly penned tunes are primed to be further burnished when these soul brothers bust them out on stage.


O'Brien listens to bluegrass and hears the music's roots in modal Irish ballads and vintage swing. He insightfully re-examines and reconstructs those styles, and many others, in his own music, throwing off new sparks by reawakening the tension and interplay of the colliding components at the heart of American music. "Over the years," he explains, "my music has become a certain thing. Each time I go into the studio to make a new album, I could make an Irish record, or a bluegrass record, or a country record…but it seems artificial to sift anything out. I feel like I'd be leaving out something important. In the end, I just try to make it round…"

As a songwriter, O'Brien has a gift for finding the profound hiding within the mundane, and bringing it out in a way that is both casually conversational and deeply felt. He is a multi-instrumentalist, with a profound reverence for some instruments. "Just as you can learn things from songs," he explains, "instruments can teach you things; especially an old one that has some ghosts in it."

Growing up in Wheeling, West Virginia, O'Brien was surrounded by classic country and bluegrass music first, subsequently augmented by the revolutionary folk music the era, including Bob Dylan, whom O'Brien paid tribute to on the acclaimed 1996 release Red On Blonde. While his sister (and occasional collaborator) Mollie took piano lessons, O'Brien pursued guitar and banjo on his own, eventually adding mandolin and fiddle to his arsenal by the time he left for college. Dropping out of a northeastern liberal arts college after a year, O'Brien headed west, eventually settling in Boulder, Colorado, where a burgeoning, eccentric roots music scene was forming. Following a stint in the endearingly ramshackle Ophelia Swing Band, O'Brien co-founded the bluegrass band Hot Rize in 1978, with guitarist Charles Sawtelle, bassist Nick Forster, and banjo player Peter Wernick. Combining a healthy reverence for bluegrass tradition with a playfully postmodern sensibility, Hot Rize became a fan and festival favorite, recording a series of acclaimed albums for the Flying Fish and Sugar
Hill labels until dissolving in 1990 – at which point O'Brien had already begun to establish himself as a solo artist.

The chance to hear an artist such as Tim O'Brien in an intimate, listening environment like The Live Oak, is not to be missed.

"We're walking out on the edge with this, in a routine way, and that's part of the exercise: to see what will happen," O'Brien notes. "It's like cooking — you add some of this, some of that, see what happens and then maybe adjust it a little bit. The shows and the songs both start that way, and hopefully people will take in and digest it and say, 'That tasted good.'"

Right after they release Memories and Moments, O'Brien and Scott will spring into action. They've set aside a year, starting in late September, "to collaborate, to play this music and to say 'Hey, we're still here' in a concentrated way," O'Brien explains. It'll be fascinating to see what these master chefs cook up.
Venue Information:
Culture Center Theater
West Virginia State Capitol Grounds
Charleston, WV, 25305
http://www.wvculture.org/agency/cultcenter.html