The Bottle Rockets, Amy Helm and more on Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage w/ Larry Groce

The Bottle Rockets, Amy Helm and more on Mountain Stage

Sun · October 21, 2018

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

15-30

Available online to Mountain Stage Members at mountainstage.org/member starting Friday August 10 at 10a.m.

Public On Sale Friday August 17 at 10a.m

 

Advance Tickets: $20

Mountain Stage Members: $15

Day of Show: $30

All Tickets General Admission

 

Available online, 877.987.6487 or locally at Taylor Books, downtown Charleston.

The Bottle Rockets
The Bottle Rockets
The Bottle Rockets' brand of populist, Midwestern, brawny rock 'n' roll is a sound so effortless, it's easy to take their craft for granted; a sound so universal, yet unmistakably THE BOTTLE ROCKETS. They've crushed rowdy Friday night crowds, convinced sitting audiences to get on their feet, and pulled weary festival onlookers across muddy fields to the front of the stage. With their 12th album, South Broadway Athletic Club, the quartet gives a master class in capturing the beauty of everyday life, and painting a portrait of ongoing hope.

South Broadway Athletic Club is an album full of new experiences for the band. Although they again worked with longtime producer Eric "Roscoe" Ambel (of Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, The Del-Lords, The Yayhoos) it was the first time the group recorded a full album in their hometown of St. Louis, Missouri. Working at Sawhorse Studios, it was also the first time they scheduled sessions in batches over several months, allowing the songs - and the whole album - to fully breathe and unfold. The extended songwriting process not only allowed a gestation period for the music, but also created the opportunity for a new musical collaboration with the Nashville hit-songwriting family The Henningsens, resulting in the song "Something Good." These fresh directions helped focus the band's creativity and energy throughout the recording sessions, adding further dimension to the album.

Singer/guitarist Brian Henneman meticulously crafts lyric-chapters straight from his well-worn journal. The album's sharp-as-shit songwriting kicks off with "Monday (Everytime I Turn Around)," and the tough but tender "Big Lotsa Love." The latter is built on engaging wordplay that takes the listener through the ups and downs of working through the world with someone you care about. In "Dog," a jangly, Byrds-infused, unaffected but never cloying, tribute (with Henneman's new weapon of choice: a chimey, 12-string Rickenbacker) to a favorite canine, he sings, "I love my dog, he's my dog/ If you don't love my dog, that's OK/ I don't want you to, he's my dog." The zen-like wisdom transcends merely a song about a pet and, rather, packs the message and life philosophy that, "Sometimes life is just this simple."

Sonically, The Bottle Rockets still find the quickest two-lane highway into the bloodstream. There are pulses through the rhythm section of Mark Ortmann's made for FM radio, wall-of-sound drumming and bassist Keith Voegele's deep and shapely lines. They are Missouri's answer to Muscle Shoals' The Swampers – Swiss Army knife players, distinctive and in the pocket. It's honed further with John Horton's classic rock guitar snarl on "I Don't Wanna Know," a song that could otherwise be a Tom Jones classic about a relationship lie. On the speaker-rattling "Building Chryslers," Horton and Henneman ignite a crunchy guitar duel that'd fit nicely on the LP shelf between Dinosaur Jr and Thin Lizzy. The song is a compelling character study told only as The Bottle Rockets can.

Shimmering, fresh coats of paint are applied in "Ship It On the Frisco," a Southern soul-influenced song about childhood train hopping, and "XOYOU," which showcases the band's cosmopolitan touches through a Rockpile/Nick Lowe-inflected pop gem mixing in shuffling drums, handclaps and harmonies. Elsewhere, "Big Fat Nuthin'" is an earwormworthy "ode" to exhaustion with a Black Flag "TV Party" vibe.

Throughout their entire career, The Bottle Rockets have managed to stay true to the rabid music heads as well as casual dial-turning everybodies. After 20+ years, they've come out on the other side stronger and more energized than ever before, proactively writing their own creative arc. Against the odds, the Bottle Rockets are a true American success story. Consequently, South Broadway Athletic Club is an album as relevant as their formative early work; political by not being political, re-affirming our greatest aspirations by focusing on the tiniest of truths.
Amy Helm
Amy Helm
Amy Helm sought what she calls a “circular sound” for her new album. It’s a well-rounded one, one marked by streaks of Americana, country, blues, and gospel, and the kinds of four-part harmonies that can burst open a melody and close the loop of an octave. And sentimentally, it’s a sound that represents the feeling of community.
John R. Miller & The Engine Lights
John R. Miller & The Engine Lights
John R Miller grew up in Hedgesville, a small town in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia where the mountains meet Interstate 81. A co-founding member of hard-traveling bands Prison Book Club and The Fox Hunt, and crafting a unique-and-familiar blend of country blues & folk, he has performed music in nearly all 50 states, Canada, Ireland, the UK, Japan, and much of Europe. He has twice appeared on NPR's Mountain Stage with The Fox Hunt, and as a bassist he has performed and toured extensively with the Hackensaw Boys, Locust Honey, William Matheny & the Strange Constellations, and many others. He has also been a featured songwriter and performer on the Travelin' Appalachians Revue. John can often be found performing solo, alongside fiddle player Chloe Edmonstone, or with his band The Engine Lights. New album is due in 2018 via Emperor Records.
Alela Diane
Alela Diane
In music, one of the most transformative experiences a woman can have is also an unspoken artistic taboo: Have a baby if you must. But for goodness’ sake, don’t write songs about it.

Critically acclaimed singer-songwriter Alela Diane has a problem with that.

“This music is about motherhood,” Alela says of her highly anticipated fifth album Cusp. “Even just by saying that, it feels like people will write you off. It’s like you’ve suddenly lost the charm of being youthful and even attainable––you’ve been commoditized as available. There is not a big place in the music industry for 30-something women with kids making music.” She laughs as she pauses, then adds, “Maybe we can create that space.”

If anyone can carve out needed new territory, it’s Alela. Cusp may be a thematic departure for the Portland, Oregon-based artist, but the Argus-eyed writing and clear voice that have long-since wowed Pitchfork, NME, Paste, and other early adopters throughout Europe and elsewhere have never been stronger.

The new 11-song collection was born during Alela’s three-week artist residency at Caldera in Oregon during January 2016. The time was a revelation to Alela, who’d been consumed with her then two-year-old daughter and had found little time to create. In a small A-frame cabin deep within Caldera’s snowy woods, alone for the first time since becoming a mother, she tended to a wood stove, made soup, rediscovered how to be on her own, and wrote songs. “I was just coming back to myself and learning how to take care of me,” she says. “It was really wonderful to be able to get back in touch with my creative side and just reflect on the intensity of what I’d been going through, becoming a mom––reflecting on that from a space where I wasn’t inside of it.”
Hubby Jenkins
Hubby Jenkins
Venue Information:
Culture Center Theater
West Virginia State Capitol Grounds
Charleston, WV, 25305
http://www.wvculture.org/agency/cultcenter.html