Livingston Taylor and more on Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage w/ Larry Groce

Livingston Taylor and more on Mountain Stage

Sun · October 7, 2018

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

$15-30

This event is all ages

Available online to Mountain Stage Members at mountainstage.org/members starting Friday July 13 at 10a.m.

Public On Sale Friday July 20 at 10a.m

 

Available online at mountainstage.ticketfly.com, 877.987.6487 or locally at Taylor Books, downtown Charleston.

Advance Tickets: $20

Mountain Stage Members: $15

Day of Show: $30

All Tickets General Admission

Livingston Taylor
Livingston Taylor
Livingston Taylor picked up his first guitar at the age of 13, which began a 50-year career that has encompassed performance, songwriting, and teaching. Born in Boston and raised in North Carolina, Livingston is the fourth child in a very musical family that includes Alex, James, Kate, and Hugh. Livingston recorded his first record at the age of 18 and has continued to create well crafted, introspective, and original songs that have earned him listeners worldwide.

From top-40 hits “I Will Be in Love with You” and “I’ll Come Running,” to “I Can Dream of You” and “Boatman,” the last two recorded by his brother James, Livingston’s creative output has continued unabated. His musical knowledge has inspired a varied repertoire, and he is equally at home with a range of musical genres—folk, pop, gospel, jazz—and from upbeat storytelling and touching ballads to full orchestra performances.

Livingston has never stopped performing since those early coffeehouse days, shared the stage with major artists such as Joni Mitchell, Linda Ronstadt, Fleetwood Mac, Jimmy Buffett, and Jethro Tull, and he maintains a busy concert schedule, touring internationally. He is a natural performer, peppering his shows with personal stories, anecdotes and ineffable warmth that connect him to his fans. His relaxed on-stage presence belies the depth of his musical knowledge, and fans might just as often be treated to a classic Gershwin or something from the best of Broadway.

Livingston is a full professor at Berklee College of Music, where he has taught a Stage Performance course since 1989. He teaches young artists invaluable lessons learned over the course of an extensive career on the road; the course is consistently voted the most popular at the College. His high-selling book, Stage Performance, released in 2011 offers those lessons to anyone who is interested in elevating their presentation standards to professional standards.

Livingston's 50th year of making music was celebrated by Boston Mayor Marty Walsh and Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, both declaring January 18, 2017 "Livingston Taylor Day".
Gretchen Peters
Gretchen Peters
There’s a bittersweet beauty to the passing of time — the changes it brings are just as often heartbreaking as they are heartwarming. The inevitable tension that arises from that sway is Gretchen Peters’ most trusted muse. “The years go by like days. Sometimes the days go by like years. And I don’t know which one I hate the most,” she sings in “Arguing with Ghosts,” the hauntingly wistful opening cut on her new album, Dancing with the Beast.

Between the melody and the melancholy, the song sets the tone for all that is to come after and lifts the album over the high artistic bar set by her last outing, 2015’s award-winning Blackbirds. Written with Matraca Berg and Ben Glover, “Arguing with Ghosts” began, as so many songs do, with one small grain of inspiration. “I think we were initially talking about how Nashville is changing, and Matraca said, ‘I get lost in my hometown,’” Peters recalls. “And we went from there. Of course, it took on much more meaning, but I think that our starting point was just that sense of disorientation.”

Whether a single sentence or a simple setting, once planted, even the tiniest seed can grow into a vision unto itself. Strung together and populated with strong and broken female heroines, those vignettes make up Dancing with the Beast and, indeed, Peters’ entire discography. “The pictures and the details come first, and I think that’s kind of necessary because they’re sort of like little bombs of emotion,” she says. “It’s like when you pull out a Polaroid that you haven’t seen in 25 years, and your heart just kind of explodes because it brings back a whole world.”
Jill Barber
Jill Barber
Jill Barber (born 1980 in Toronto) is a Canadian singer, songwriter now based in Vancouver, British Columbia. With many awards and nominations, she is one of Canada’s most recognizable musicians.

Her new album, "Metaphora" is out now.
Sean Rowe
Sean Rowe
Sean Rowe has spent much of the last year traveling the country with just his guitar, performing in people's living rooms. "It's like I'm some kind of a bearded salesman," he says, "Going door to door but instead of vacuum cleaners I'm selling all these feelings that come with the songs. It's a really intense experience for listeners to have me there in their homes playing. They're not used to having a stranger show up, play music, drink their beer and eat their food. But I think that's how we're supposed to be. It only feels strange because we've made it that way."

It is this same sense of unflinching connection that has shaped Rowe's extraordinary new album Madman. The singer, who The Wall Street Journal wrote "recalls the ecstatic intensity of late-'60s Van Morrison and stark subtlety of late-era Johnny Cash" has created a beautifully primal work. Madman is deliberately, if not defiantly, simple in both arrangement and composition. It is soul music in the purest and most literal sense, hypnotic rhythms, warmly distorted guitars and Rowe's incredible voice recalling a time, real or imagined, when music and people seemed distinctly more connected.

Rowe's previous Anti- release, The Salesmen and The Shark, was a far more polished affair recorded in Los Angeles with the accompaniment of West Coast session players. This time around, Rowe is intent on replicating the immense emotional power of his live performances. The process began with Rowe alone in an upstate New York recording studio with his guitar, laying down riffs that would become songs. For Madman, an album he was self-producing, Rowe wanted to strip away much of the production and focus instead on the voice and guitar style he had perfected in theaters, nightclubs and living rooms. "I came to this realization that the songs don't have to be structurally heavy to be intense," he explains. "It's more about the honesty and emotion behind the delivery. A lot of these songs are pretty simple but I was really thoughtful about that, it was intentional. I wanted to go right to the heart."

The record begins with the title track Madman. A rhythmic guitar, lilting piano and melodic bass, punctuated by horns all of it in the service of Rowe's incredibly soulful voice. "My singing is definitely more playful on this record," he says. "Lyrically the song is about living this life when you're on the road more than you're at home." It is an immensely personal and heartfelt song for the recent father and dedicated naturalist, with Rowe singing, "When the road takes me to the other side of the world/Let a walnut tree replace me/Give my body back to the birds".

Rowe came of age listening to a father's record collection that included The Beach Boys, Elvis Presley and more. But in his late teens it was soul and blues that spoke to the bourgeoning singer-songwriter. Rowe says the sound of Madman is influenced, in large part, by the hypnotic driving guitars of Delta blues. "I was listening to records by R.L. Burnside and John Lee Hooker and others which are basically just guitar and drums and really raw sounding. I was also listening to the early soul records like Otis Redding and Ray Charles. I didn't want to try and duplicate those sounds, just take aspects of them and make them my own."

The influence of Delta blues is most apparent on the album's second track "Shine My Diamond Ring" with its driving repetitive guitar and stomping bass drum. "The guitar sound was influenced by John Lee Hooker," Rowe says. "The version you hear on the record — which was mostly a live cut — almost never happened as it was very last minute. We already had an earlier version of Shine that i was happy with but on this particular day we had about 15 minutes to kill till wrap up time and i felt if i grabbed the drummer and recorded this song live with just the two of us, I could nail it even better. I'm glad I did that."

"Desiree" is a raucous deconstructed take on early disco, with a pulsating bass, Nile Rogers-like guitar picking and a looser than ever Rowe singing with absolute abandon. "It's so different than any song I've done before, Rowe says. "It's a really fun song and it felt good. It's one of those songs that I felt like I needed to write. With the thumping bass and drums it needed a lot of space so we tried to keep as many holes in it as possible. The vocals were cut live in one take."

On Sean Rowe's latest, the adage less is more is on full display. This is a record of extraordinary honesty intent on establishing a connection. In its deliberate simplicity there is pure sonic emotion. "I wanted to go right to the heart with this," he explains. "And sometimes that meant seeing how much we could remove. It helps to have a great recording. But I would rather have great performances and that's what I was after here. Sometimes when you're listening to a piece of music you don't have to think about it, you just feel it. It's primal and you trust it."
Amber Rubarth
Amber Rubarth
Amber Rubarth has performed her music far and wide, touring solo across South Africa, Europe, Japan, and all throughout America with her “unique gift of knocking down walls with songs so strong they sound like classics from another era.” -Acoustic Guitar Magazine. She was recently cast alongside Joe Purdy to star in the feature film 'American Folk' which won numerous festival awards and was released in theaters January 2018 (Good Deed Entertainment). The film received high praise with the Hollywood Reporter calling it "Superb... A heartfelt homage to American folk music," and Rolling Stone premiering the first single as “Enchanting… beautifully recalls several of the duets that John Prine has sung so effectively with frequent partner Iris DeMent, yet it offers the added bonus of discovering two wondrous new voices."
Venue Information:
Culture Center Theater
West Virginia State Capitol Grounds
Charleston, WV, 25305
http://www.wvculture.org/agency/cultcenter.html